Design for Social Impact

  • Materials for Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Ehrlich,​​ Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ and Kevin​​ Schneider.
    Materials for Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Ehrlich,​​ Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ and Kevin​​ Schneider.
  • Flashcards: Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Erlich, Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ Kevin​​ Schneider.
    Flashcards: Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Erlich, Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ Kevin​​ Schneider.
  • Tabling mock-up: Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Ehrlich,​​ Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ Kevin​​ Schneider.
    Tabling mock-up: Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Ehrlich,​​ Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ Kevin​​ Schneider.
  • Booklet for Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Ehrlich,​​ Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ and Kevin​​ Schneider.
    Booklet for Understanding Health Research. Sabrina​​ Roberts,​​ Katie​​ Ehrlich,​​ Kristen ​​DeMondo,​​ and Kevin​​ Schneider.
  • "A Look at Opioids: Avoiding Misuse." Ruby Rose.
    "A Look at Opioids: Avoiding Misuse." Ruby Rose.
  • "Are you at risk?" opioids research poster. Kevin​​ Schneider. 
    "Are you at risk?" opioids research poster. Kevin​​ Schneider. 

Fall 2017 Special Topics in Communication Design course led by assistant professor Penina Acayo Laker

Upper-level communication design students in assistant professor Penina Acayo Laker’s Design for Social Impact course developed their ability to utilize design research methods, creatively solve problems from a human-centered position, and work in a collaborative setting. To practice these skills, they tackled two projects during the semester dealing with pressing issues in health that can be address through design and communication.

In the first project, the students dove into the opioid addiction epidemic to understand the human experience and design tools to address it. Students started by analyzing the data behind the crisis, humanizing it through a series of posters that explained and visualized relevant statistics and facts. These posters helped expose the complexity of the impact of the epidemic on people and allowed each student to narrow their focus and identify a specific context to investigate.

Students then had conversations with people impacted by the epidemic, including healthcare providers, family members, and addicts. These conversations helped to reveal opportunities for design intervention.

Students developed prototype of a proposed intervention for a specific context, which ranged from prevention guides for high school students to apps to track patients’ pain over time.

A group of students also worked with the Center for Community Health Partnership & Research (CCHPR). CCHPR works to foster communication between communities and academics in the St. Louis region. Their Research Engagement to Advance Community Health (REACH) initiative takes staff members into communities throughout St. Louis to provide education about health research. Over time, they’ve found that communicating about health research is challenging—their content is dense and many communities are resistant to the idea of health research. Students developed a suite of materials, including banners, takeaways, pamphlets, and other collateral to make health research topics more approachable and memorable in the long-term.

 

Partners

Center for Community Health Partnership & Research (CCHPR)