Advanced Studio, Spring 2009: Dean

  • Work by Alen Basic for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
    Work by Alen Basic for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Alen Basic for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
    Work by Alen Basic for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Alen Basic for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
    Work by Alen Basic for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
    Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
    Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Zachary Rousou for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.
    Work by Zachary Rousou for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2009.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2009
SYSTEMIC STRATEGY

Kathryn Dean, Professor

The studio capitalizes on the Spring 2009 exhibition, Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future. Students study the structural expressionism that grounds Saarinen’s work as a springboard to deploying innovative structural strategies based on ideas of digital fabrication. Initial investigations look at strategies for multiplying similar structural approaches in a push to make this mid-20th century second wave of modernism into an architecture in the 21st century, through ideas of transformation and repetition.

The program is the design of a new building for the Schools of Art and Architecture at Washington University. Referencing the theatricality embedded in Saarinen’s expressionism, we look at ways to juxtapose Art and Architecture to further support the dialogue intended by the unification of the two schools under the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts. Students investigate two sites for the project, both on the Danforth campus, and select the one that supports the most powerful rendition of their conception of this reciprocal dialogue.

The goal is to use the programs of the schools (jury spaces, exhibition formats, etc.) to invent new usages that strengthen this shared identity. In addition to these public event spaces, students must relate studio spaces that allow for more individual encounters. This juxtaposition can range from harmonious unity to challenging opposition as we seek to find fertile territory that provokes authentic creative endeavors.