Advanced Studio, Spring 2009: Kim

  • Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
    Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
    Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
    Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
    Work by Michele Richards for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Jocelyn Hoppe for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
    Work by Jocelyn Hoppe for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Jocelyn Hoppe for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.
    Work by Jocelyn Hoppe for advanced studio taught by Sung Ho Kim, Spring 2009.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2009
DMZ ECO-STATION

Sung Ho Kim, Assistant Professor

The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) is a strip of land that serves as a buffer zone between North and South Korea. The DMZ cuts the Korean Peninsula in half, crossing the 38th parallel on an angle, with the west end of the DMZ lying south of the parallel and the east end lying north of it.

The DMZ is one of the last remaining hot spots of the Cold War. At 155 miles long and approximately 2.5 miles wide, it is the most heavily armed border in the world, with more than one million heavily armed soldiers and minefields, artillery, and barbed wire surrounding the zone. Inside, the DMZ has become a treasure of flourishing wildlife, with humans absent for more than 56 years. There have been sightings of the endangered Siberian tigers, Manchurian cranes, and more than 180 rare types of flora and fauna.

Given the spread of urbanization from sprawling Seoul and the destruction of many southern wetlands, some preservationists want parts of the DMZ to remain off limits forever. But a team of southern environmentalists hopes to turn the DMZ into a nature haven, with a peace park, research center, and carefully controlled eco-tourism.

In May 2007, trains crossed into the heavily fortified DMZ for the first rail journey through the border dividing the two Koreas in more than half a century, the latest symbol of historic reconciliation between the longtime foes.

In this studio, students develop their own program for a train station with an observatory for eco-tourism, using Korean cultural, historical, and geological development as a vehicle for merging new programmatic situations.