MUD Studio, Fall 2008: Heyda

  • Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
    Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
  • Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
    Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
  • Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
    Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
  • Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
    Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
  • Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
    Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
  • Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.
    Work by C. Wen for MUD studio taught by Patty Heyda, Fall 2008.

MUD Studio, Fall 2008
THE METROPOLITAN LANDSCAPE

Patty Heyda, Visiting Assistant Professor

The Metropolitan Landscape is a term used to describe contemporary urban agglomerations like St. Louis and its surrounding areas. Metropolitan landscapes cannot be characterized by a single physical condition, but encompass a spectrum of diverse urbanisms that vary in the relationships of buildings to open space; in their scales, patterns, types, and uses; and in the ways they articulate and interact with each other and with linking infrastructures.

This course, required for all first-year MUD students, provides the foundational skills for students to engage the complexity of metropolitan landscapes while negotiating criteria of design quality, sustainability, human use patterns, and in-depth knowledge of systemic and inter-scalar relationships.

Students work on one of three distinct urban areas/site types in the metropolitan region: West (floodplain), East (downtown/Arch), or North (historic housing fabric). In the process, they become familiar with concepts related to urban form, land use, typology, infrastructure, ecosystems, and environmental systems through the analysis and design of formal strategies within their urban site type.

After working in groups to conduct analysis of the St. Louis region and one of the urban areas, students work individually to develop neighborhood-scaled proposals that test typological, formal, and programmatic strategies on their selected site area. This work concludes with prototypical sections (at the building scale). The final urban design proposal clearly demonstrates a position toward and strategy for incorporating the previous analysis work.