MUD Studio, Spring 2009: Marpillero

  • Work by Andrew Zimmerman for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
    Work by Andrew Zimmerman for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Andrew Zimmerman MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
    Work by Andrew Zimmerman MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Andrew Zimmerman for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
    Work by Andrew Zimmerman for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Glenn Timmons for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
    Work by Glenn Timmons for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Glenn Timmons for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
    Work by Glenn Timmons for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Glenn Timmons for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.
    Work by Glenn Timmons for MUD studio taught by Sandro Marpillero, Spring 2009.

MUD Studio, Spring 2009
QUEENS PLAZA – URBAN OPERATIONS – MULTI-LAYERED PUBLIC SPACES

Sandro Marpillero, Visiting Professor
with Phu Duong and Peter Elsbeck

This urban design studio focuses on Queens Plaza in Long Island City (LIC), a key urban infrastructural node in the inner periphery of New York City. LIC extends for 1.3 miles through disparate urban fabrics and systems between the East River and Sunnyside Yard, a sunken, partially disused railroad yard. This complex site is characterized by the presence of two elevated subway line viaducts above the Queensborough Bridge that connect this area to Midtown Manhattan.

NYC’s Department of City Planning has rezoned this portion of LIC for the development of a regional sub-center that includes commercial and residential high-rise buildings. In this studio, students evaluate the planning framework with the intent of redefining the relationship between these projected buildings’ lower portions and the potential for multi-layered public space. Great consideration is given to the potential embedded in the site’s topography as it relates to the effects of climate change on the NYC estuarine environment.

A basic assumption of the studio is that the “analysis” phase of the project already constitutes an integral act of design. Students develop multiple techniques for the representation and interpretation of the site’s multi-scalar, multi-level realities. Environmental art installation, explored through case studies and site-specific assignments, serves as a significant reference for the studio. Three special workshops further support the acquisition of advanced digital skills, allowing for the production of hybrid drawings, dynamic notations, and conceptual modeling analogues.