Advanced Studio, Spring 2009: McCarter

  • Work by Eduardo Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
    Work by Eduardo Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Eduardo Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
    Work by Eduardo Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Eduardo Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
    Work by Eduardo Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Margaret Cooke for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
    Work by Margaret Cooke for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Margaret Cooke for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
    Work by Margaret Cooke for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Rebecca Rowney for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.
    Work by Rebecca Rowney for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Spring 2009.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2009
A MONTESSORI SCHOOL: SPACE AND LEARNING IN CONTEMPORARY ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Robert McCarter, Ruth & Norman Moore Professor
Robert Gero, Lecturer in the Graduate School of Art

This architecture studio, the first of its kind at the graduate level in the Sam Fox School, works in parallel with a graduate art studio. The two studios meet at least once a week to pursue a variety of parallel exercises centered on the subject of Montessori education, as well as its precursors and offspring. The collaborative setup introduces students to the “tradition” of architects and artists sharing concepts of space, order, and perception, as they work across fields to construct joint pedagogical events and exercises.

For this architecture studio, students engage the design of a small Montessori School. They begin with two projects, each about three weeks in length, that are inspired in part by art and architecture critic Adrian Stokes’ thoughts on carving. The first project, “Carving the Classroom: Abstract CUBE,” is intentionally abstract and requires each student to construct a highly resolved proposal for a single Montessori classroom. The second project, “Etching the Earth: Concrete DATUM,” is intentionally concrete and requires each student to evolve a highly resolved spatial proposal, deploying the programmatic elements of the Montessori School to construct a “society of spaces” as an inhabited surface.

Following these initial projects, the site for the school is given and developed over the remainder of the semester. This final project asks students to bring the building design to a high level of resolution. As is appropriate to the “tectonic culture” of modern architecture, students are asked to resolve “the poetics of construction” of their design, developing the materials, construction, and details that shape the interior experience of the school’s inhabitants.