Advanced Studio, Spring 2009: Koster

  • Work by Jenelle Lovings for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
    Work by Jenelle Lovings for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Jenelle Lovings for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
    Work by Jenelle Lovings for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Adriane Riesser for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
    Work by Adriane Riesser for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Adriane Riesser for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
    Work by Adriane Riesser for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Evan Sakofsky for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
    Work by Evan Sakofsky for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.
    Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Don Koster, Spring 2009.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2009
COMMUNITY DESIGN STUDIO: PREFAB HOUSING IN THE VILLE

Don Koster, Visiting Assistant Professor

The Ville neighborhood, considered to be the cradle of African American culture in the City of St. Louis, was once a vibrant, self-contained community. Following desegregation in the 1960s and 70s, the face of the neighborhood changed dramatically, with a major population decline. Concerned residents and neighborhood leaders are actively fighting to preserve The Ville’s legacy while attempting to provide much-needed economic stimulation and services. Demographic trends show that the population in The Ville is slowly rebounding, but little of the remaining housing stock is sufficiently large enough to support families who might be interested in returning to the neighborhood.

This comprehensive studio focuses on the design of a new multi-unit housing development, built by private developers associated with The Ville Marketplace project. It takes into account pragmatic and realistic constraints — economic realities, code and zoning limitations, etc. – while promoting progressive, innovative, and environmentally responsible housing designs that energize the redevelopment of the neighborhood.

Students must establish an individual typological response deemed appropriate for the site conditions, community, and developer goals and thoroughly develop the design proposal to a high level of resolution. Research on prefabricated assemblies and methods informs their individual housing designs, as well as visits to The Ville community and talks with residents, community leaders, and project developers. Consideration and implementation of sustainable construction practices is required of all proposals. Students are asked to apply environmental performance design software to evaluate the energy efficiency of proposals, in addition to developing large-scale physical models.