Advanced Studio, Fall 2009: Bailo, Rull & Luchini

  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
  • Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
    Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
  • Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.
    Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Manuel Bailo, Rosa Rull & Adrian Luchini, Fall 2009.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2009
(DIS)LOCATED CONDITIONS

Manuel Bailo, Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor
Rosa Rull, Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor
Adrian Luchini, Raymond E. Maritz Professor of Architecture

The working method for the studio is based on the selective superposition of valid conditions to design. By working simultaneously in two different locations—Barcelona and St. Louis—students learn how to map out these conditions. They are encouraged to design as though they are constructing conditions that will aid in our thinking about architecture.

The format for the studio is non-linear, trusting simultaneity as a fundamental characteristic of a process of production that allows, at the same time, for efficiency and surprise. Throughout the semester, the three instructors alternate, each taking on specific tasks every week with the goal of generating concrete information to be manipulated until the level of definition is the project – a process, therefore, without aprioris. They know how to begin the project, but are uncertain of how it can end. These conditions help in defining the course of action to take along the way—the project itself is a journey.

Following initial investigations into conditions such as geography, anthropology, and society at sites in Barcelona (Raval) and St. Louis (Richmond Heights), students develop conceptual proposals for a recplex for each of the sites, then further define the architectural project by exploring three other conditions: space program, structure, and materiality.

By the midway point in the semester, students choose one of the two projects—Barcelona or St. Louis—to continue to develop from the multiple layers the detailed section has already incorporated. Other considerations at this point include interior space, landscape/urbanscape, and energy and construction.