Advanced Studio, Fall 2009: Spina

  • Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
    Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
  • Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
    Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
  • Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
    Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
  • Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
    Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
  • Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
    Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
  • Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.
    Student work from advanced studio taught by Marcelo Spina, Fall 2009.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2009
TESSELLATED MANIFOLDS

Marcelo Spina, Visiting Professor

The relationship between armature and skin, as well as between structure and ornament, has long haunted the discipline of architecture since the early Gothic. Geometry and pattern can become a fundamental source for the emergence and articulation of a tectonic system. Moreover, embedded linework, patterns, and various mathematical forms of tessellation within surfaces often contain latent structural potential and yielding capacity.

This studio investigates the potential of advanced shell construction, including geometry, and various ways of tessellation such as tiling and stalactites, structuration, discretization, depth, coloring, materialization, and tectonic assembly.

By investigating contemporary vault construction, articulation, and ornamentation – particularly looking into the rich tradition of arabesque and Islamic patterns – students develop an arsenal of techniques that are then applied in the construction of a series of physical models utilizing three-dimensional printers and laser cutters. Next, they construct prototypes using CNC milling technology and plastic forming. The final project is the production of a full-scale construction/installation.