Advanced Studio, Fall 2009: Yarinsky & MacKeith

  • Work by Brad Cooke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
    Work by Brad Cooke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Brad Cooke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
    Work by Brad Cooke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Brad Cooke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
    Work by Brad Cooke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
    Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
    Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
  • Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.
    Work by Dennis Burke for advanced studio taught by Adam Yarinsky & Peter MacKeith, Spring 2009.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2009
NEW ECONOMY/ECONOMY OF MEANS

Adam Yarinsky, Visiting Professor
Peter MacKeith, Associate Professor

The current economic situation offers an opportunity to critically reflect on architecture’s relationship to culture and on the goals and means of the design process. Broad technical changes are redefining institutions and programs, in turn transforming the way buildings and spaces function within society. Within the profession, new capabilities for information modeling and visualization are uniting building performance and design, while the integration of design and fabrication continues to redefine the paradigm of construction.

A renewed engagement with "economy of means," understood as both a conceptual and practical necessity, structures the program of this studio, with the work of artist Donald Judd serving as a primary point of reference. Central to Judd’s thinking was recognition of the relationship between a work of art and the physical setting in which it is displayed. He worked with an economy of means that belied an intensity, complexity, and precision of space-making, advocating for the appropriate presentation of art independent of museums and the "art market."

In this studio, students develop a library and study center for the Judd Foundation in New York City, which is dedicated to the preservation of his living and working spaces. The new structure is to be located across the street from Judd’s residence and studio, and the program includes a duplicate copy of each book in Judd’s Marfa, Texas, library, as well as space for reading, accessing digital information, teaching, and offices. The project links the organization of information with the intimate engagement with books and digital information, as a means of connecting program and space in the design of a building.