MUD Studio, Summer 2010: Tijuana

  • Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
    Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
  • Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
    Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
  • Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
    Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
  • Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
    Work by Philip Burkhardt for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
  • Work by Sarah Burnett for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
    Work by Sarah Burnett for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
  • Work by Sarah Burnett for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.
    Work by Sarah Burnett for MUD studio in Tijuana taught by John Hoal, Summer 2010.

MUD International Studio: Tijuana, Summer 2010
THE MC_TJ_LA FLUVIA TRANSECT: WATER+
sustainable urbanism for mexico city_tijuana_los angeles

John Hoal, Associate Professor

The final MUD studio investigates the relationships between three major cities and their urban rivers: Los Angeles and the Los Angeles River, Tijuana and Rio Tijuana, and Mexico City and Valle de Chalco. These cities can trace their urban history to their rivers, which are the major source of water for agriculture, human consumption, and economic activity. The first settlers strived to live in symbiosis with the river and their watersheds. But as these areas were industrialized, all three developed through excessive degradation of their natural environments due to population increase, rampant development, and overall disregard of matters in sustainable planning and conservation. The fate of the rivers was concrete channelization to control flooding.

Today these cities are redirecting efforts to revitalize the riverfronts. Los Angeles intends to remove the concrete channel in some areas of the Los Angeles River, implementing a series of public spaces along its flow and restoring native vegetation. The Tijuana River is part of a bi-national environmental debate between San Diego and Tijuana, and efforts to control waste runoff from adjacent squatting settlements is a primary concern. The floods of early 2010 in Mexico City made the canals along urban areas overflow, endangering the lives of thousands of inhabitants in Valle de Chalco. It is imperative to the future of these urban areas to redirect attention to their natural habitat.

This urban design summer studio seeks to locate the common threads between all three urban areas and strategize punctual and local alternatives along the rivers, with the inspiration of returning to a symbiotic existence between society and nature, and developing potential for a sustainable urban future.