Advanced Studio, Spring 2010: Arets & McCarter

  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
    Work by Aaron Plewke for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
    Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.
    Work by Meredith Klein for advanced studio taught by Wiel Arets & Robert McCarter, Spring 2010.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2010
A WONDERFUL WORLD

Wiel Arets, Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor
Robert McCarter, Ruth & Norman Moore Professor

To understand the World we are living in currently, we must redefine the "Map of the World," a mental construct that has undergone many reinterpretations since 1492. We could read the World anno 2020 as a collective living space in which all the continents are in reach within 288 minutes, and the maximum travel distance at each continent is 72 minutes. The basic question we should put forward is: How will the city develop within our extremely exciting, complex, but "shrinking" world? We have to radically change our perception of what a city is, finding new definitions for what we call "the city" or "the Metropolis."
 
New infrastructural devices must be devised that have a great influence on the development of the "Un-Conscious City"—the city we experience in a dreamlike condition, the seemingly un-complex perception of a new reality. The Un-Conscious City should be seen as a model of a new or reconstructed existing Metropolis that works within the "New Map of the World."

In this studio, students work collectively on developing a "New Map of the World," and individually on developing the design for a 72,000-square-meter hybrid building that includes housing as the common program and is sited in one of 20 selected Metropolises around the world. These individual design projects will concretize the conception of "A Wonderful World," grounding it in the specific contexts of a selected group of rapidly changing international urban centers. In this way, each student is required to give concrete, place-specific architectural presence to the collectively generated theoretical and speculative ideas recorded in the "New Map of the World."