Advanced Studio, Spring 2010: Kathryn Dean

  • Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
    Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
    Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
    Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
    Work by Belle Stone for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Yang Xu for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
    Work by Yang Xu for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Yang Xu for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.
    Work by Yang Xu for advanced studio taught by Kathryn Dean, Spring 2010.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2010
CITY EYE…
…city i
…a baroque abstraction

Kathryn Dean, Professor

The studio looks at the City as a Construct of Identity, focusing on the ultimate American city, New York City. New York is a city constructed like the country—it is a city of raw ambition, a city that looks toward the future, a city of desire. The city skyline is the identity of this desire—a horizon where skyscraper egos inhabit the sky.  This skyline is an identity that prejudices the eye—it prejudices the image and the construct of identity.

The site is latent with all the ambitions that define this city. It is a hinge between two powerful conditions in lower Manhattan: the World Trade Center site and the urban corridor joining Chase Manhattan Plaza. This site ties together the desires of two members of the Rockefeller family. Chase Manhattan Bank, constructed under David Rockefeller, is a transparent glass tower located in front of the Federal Reserve Bank. The World Trade Center was constructed during the governorship of Nelson Rockefeller, an incredible collector of art who established the New York State Council on the Arts and served as president of the Museum of Modern Art. The site thus has a unique relationship to both finance and art, with both desires embedded into this place.

To access this desire, students construct a contemporary baroque. The baroque style is the ultimate expression of dual desire; it is accessible to emotions, but also provides a visible statement of wealth and power. Students propose a hybrid program: a given gallery program and a second program of their choice in their definition of an identity for the New York State Council on the Arts.