Advanced Studio, Spring 2010: Della Valle & Bernheimer

  • Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
    Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
    Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
    Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
    Work by Jeffrey Sullivan for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Zachary Rousou for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
    Work by Zachary Rousou for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Zachary Rousou for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.
    Work by Zachary Rousou for advanced studio taught by Jared Della Valle & Andrew Bernheimer, Spring 2010.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2010
ABOVE/BELOW ---------- SOFT/LOUD

Jared Della Valle, Visiting Professor
Andrew Bernheimer, Visiting Professor

The landscape of New York City has changed greatly over the past decade. The real estate boom in New York City inspired many developers to bypass traditional methods of building delivery (bottom-line driven, cheap, and fast) and hire high-profile designers to execute costly, dazzling projects. In the last year, as the economy has imploded and credit availability has vanished, architecture and its allied fields have suffered greatly, with the prognosis for new, important architecture quite poor.

Regardless, New York City offers a strange laboratory. Land values, while dropping many places, can still make building prohibitive. Architecture is oftentimes at the mercy of the economy and zoning restrictions. Sometimes, with wonderful result, it can simply be based on the whim of property owners.

This studio presents two projects, one a folly and one a necessity, based in current and future real-world parameters in Brooklyn. Students are challenged to create daring, inventive, responsible, and executable architecture, in both technological and economic terms. The first project, a small reading center under the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn, engages issues of solitude, community, sound (or silence), and enclosure, culminating in large-scale models and drawings. The second project is a hybrid facility incorporating both a police station and small housing component. It is sited quite literally at the end of the Brooklyn Bridge, adjacent to Cadman Plaza Park, a construction of the 1950s that creates a linear path running from the historic neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights to the symbolic hub of Brooklyn, Borough Hall.