Advanced Studio, Spring 2010: Luchini

  • Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
    Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
    Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
    Work by Jing Chen for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Bethany Mahre for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
    Work by Bethany Mahre for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Bethany Mahre for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
    Work by Bethany Mahre for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Bethany Mahre for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.
    Work by Bethany Mahre for advanced studio taught by Adrian Luchini, Spring 2010.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2010
PARANORMALSTL
Sight lines, cite, site.

Adrian Luchini, Raymond E. Maritz Professor

Para has a Greek and Latin origin. Its most common meaning (the Greek usage) is "similar to" or "near to," as in paragraph. In Latin, para means "above," "against," "counter," "outside," or "beyond." It can be construed, then, that the term paranormal is derived from the Latin use of the prefix "para," meaning "against, counter, outside, or beyond the norm."

This semester-long project is dedicated to the exploration of the mega structures through parametric geometry. Students use four zones of intervention with a mixed program of retail, office spaces, and mobility in a typical (loaded) sub-urban condition of St. Louis. Three major aspects of the design process—circulation, materiality, and ecology—are considered through actions and decisions related to planning, landscaping, and detailing. The project encompasses urban design paired with specific design development of a chosen portion of each project.

Students work with a process of design that incorporates local data (in this case, traffic, topography, and infrastructure) as design tools to inform decisions always as positive aesthetic forces vis-à-vis a framework of the real and the possible. Working with parametric models, they develop structural forms to host the specific program.

Video of work by Bethany Mahre