MUD Studio, Spring 2010: Hoeferlin

  • Work by Julian Pelekanakis for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
    Work by Julian Pelekanakis for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Julian Pelekanakis for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
    Work by Julian Pelekanakis for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
  • Work by Julian Pelekanakis for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
    Work by Julian Pelekanakis for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
  • Work by June Kim for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
    Work by June Kim for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
  • Work by June Kim for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
    Work by June Kim for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
  • Work by June Kim for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.
    Work by June Kim for MUD studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2010.

MUD Studio, Spring 2010
POST-KATRINA NOLA, EPISODE V: OPERATION GUTTER TO GULF, PHASE II (LET'S GET APOLITICAL)

Derek Hoeferlin, Senior Lecturer
(in collaboration with the University of Toronto Department of Landscape Architecture)

Until the late-19th century, New Orleans' development was confined to the Mississippi's natural levees. In the last hundred years, though, mechanical pumping has enabled the drainage and urbanization of all of Orleans Parish. In turn, the city's illogical planning districts and physical form have been subdivided as if New Orleans were built on dry ground. This denial of physical geography played a major role in the havoc wrought by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, and presents real challenges for rebuilding New Orleans.

The city demonstrates the impossibility of separating infrastructure and habitation from ecology. New Orleans will remain vulnerable to flooding unless it expands its ability to accommodate water, but due to complicated reasons, it still doesn't have a water plan.

Building on previous Post-Katrina NOLA studios, this urban design studio seeks to convince the public sector that it is imperative to re-draw the planning district and jurisdictional boundaries of the New Orleans region based on hydrological understandings, underpinned by correlating urban design strategies. Though this may sound political, the studio attacks the issue from an opposite, apolitical view: WATER DOES WHAT WATER WANTS TO DO.

Through collaborative efforts with the University of Toronto to augment Dutch Dialogues, which advocates for the development of integrated water planning for the New Orleans region and other delta urbanisms, students first track and analyze the historical and current condition of water's presence in New Orleans. Then they speculate via spatial urban design strategies grounded in the reality of the complex situation for the future viability of the city, based on its mutual existence with water. 

Gutter to Gulf website
NOLA is Water website