Advanced Studio, Fall 2010: McCarter

  • Work by Shelby Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
    Work by Shelby Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Shelby Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
    Work by Shelby Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Laura Zediker for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
    Work by Laura Zediker for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Xin Liu for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
    Work by Xin Liu for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Shelby Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
    Work by Shelby Ponce for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Laura Zediker for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.
    Work by Laura Zediker for advanced studio taught by Robert McCarter, Fall 2010.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2010
A Public Archives for Venice: An Addition to Le Corbusier's (Unbuilt) Venice Hospital

Robert McCarter, Ruth and Norman Moore Professor

The studio program, a new Public Archives of Venice, proposes a publicly accessible copy of the State Archives of Venice, which contains the world’s most comprehensive historical records of the period 700-1800 AD. In addition to the 56 miles of shelving required to house the collection, the 50,000-square-foot program includes public reading rooms, meeting rooms, lecture halls, and other spaces appropriate to a new cultural center and meeting place for the city—and the world.

Students must design the new Public Archives as an "addition" to Le Corbusier's Venice Hospital, designed in 1964 (and, for the purposes of this project, presumed to have been built in 1967). Largely dedicated to the care of acutely or terminally ill patients, the hospital was organized on three levels: the first level connected directly to the streets and canals of the city; the second housed preventive care; the third housed terminally ill patients, their visitors, and the services they required. Le Corbusier developed the unique pinwheeling circulation diagram, as well as the layered "mat" building, from his studies of the urban fabric of Venice.

The studio begins with a sketch project that allows students to develop their own interpretation of the concept of "archive" as a place preserving records of the past for the future. Following this exercise, they take a field trip to Venice, where they visit the project site and the State Archives of Venice, among other places. Students then engage in disciplinary research by reconstructing Le Corbusier’s project for the Venice Hospital, building a model and making drawings for subsequent additions to their individual designs, which are their primary project.