Advanced Studio, Fall 2010: Roberge

  • Work by Fisk | Marshall | Ren | Waller for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
    Work by Fisk | Marshall | Ren | Waller for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Fisk | Marshall | Ren | Waller for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
    Work by Fisk | Marshall | Ren | Waller for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Li | Mondeik | Sheng | Wyrock for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
    Work by Li | Mondeik | Sheng | Wyrock for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Fisk | Marshall | Ren | Waller for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
    Work by Fisk | Marshall | Ren | Waller for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Li | Mondeik | Sheng | Wyrock for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
    Work by Li | Mondeik | Sheng | Wyrock for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
  • Work by Li | Mondeik | Sheng | Wyrock for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.
    Work by Li | Mondeik | Sheng | Wyrock for advanced studio taught by Heather Roberge, Fall 2010.

Advanced Studio, Fall 2010
Sheet Logics

Heather Roberge, Visiting Professor

This fabrication studio explores the spatial, tectonic, and assembly implications of sheet logics. Sheet logics are geometric organizations that avoid the solid logics typically associated with massing in favor of surfaces that manage both figure and ground simultaneously. Sheets are thus agents of spatial invention, because they are not tied to the limits of established geometric models but produce different ones. With sheets, there is no hierarchy of relationships between master plan, building organization, ornament, and detail.

As the subject matter of a fabrication course, sheets are a fertile test bed for design research. Sheets typically involve areas of curvature that require careful translation when produced as full-scale material assemblies. These areas behave structurally in ways that differ from flat surfaces, demanding tectonic solutions that become form-active at least in part. Thus, the implications of fabrication on both structure and skin are emphasized in the course.

Students design a cafe and exhibition space on Washington University’s campus and produce a large section of their proposals using the digital fabrication equipment available at the Sam Fox School. A large-scale architectural model and full-scale components are produced to test the proposed material assemblies. Particular emphasis is placed on the surface’s panelization and effects.