Advanced Studio, Spring 2011: Burnette

  • Work by Kristin Rose for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
    Work by Kristin Rose for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Andrew Buck for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
    Work by Andrew Buck for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Jared Marcantoni for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
    Work by Jared Marcantoni for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Jared Marcantoni for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
    Work by Jared Marcantoni for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Jared Marcantoni for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
    Work by Jared Marcantoni for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Max Bemberg for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.
    Work by Max Bemberg for advanced studio taught by Wendell Burnette, Spring 2011.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2011
Context as Material | How to Read Place

Wendell Burnette, Visiting Professor

Context, by definition, is inconclusive and thus always open to
personal interpretation. PLACE and how one reads it lies in the eye of
the beholder. It is the utmost responsibility of architects to hone the
skills to interpret, represent, and manifest meaningful, soulful
place(s) for clients, constituents, and communities. Sustainable design
is, first and foremost, good design that touches the hearts and souls of
the people, community, and PLACE(S) it serves.

As students of architecture, how do you begin to read place? Context
and how we interpret it is one of the malleable materials from which we
construct architectural space; light is another. You must passionately
engage the world around you and start assimilating personal
experience(s) into your critical local/global view such that your eyes
can touch PLACE and reinterpret it in architectural terms.

In this comprehensive studio, students build an argument as they
design. After researching aspects of the Tallgrass Prairie National
Preserve in the Kansas Flint Hills and analyzing case studies of
relevant projects, students visit the preserve to work with the National
Park Service and private land owners to determine appropriate program
and site selection, returning at a later date to present individual
arguments and receive feedback. A holistic project should confront a new
paradigm for visitor center, library, gift shop, lodging, and other
programs in context.

Art/Architecture is often simultaneously an act of resistance and an
act of collaboration. As such, each student is expected to passionately
and actively engage a process of defining his own "context as the
malleable material" for a successful solution.