Advanced Studio, Spring 2011: Hoeferlin

  • Work by Pierre Hoppenot for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
    Work by Pierre Hoppenot for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Chris Chappell for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
    Work by Chris Chappell for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Samantha Stein for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
    Work by Samantha Stein for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Pierre Hoppenot for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
    Work by Pierre Hoppenot for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Allison Mendez for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
    Work by Allison Mendez for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
  • Work by Chris Chappell for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.
    Work by Chris Chappell for advanced studio taught by Derek Hoeferlin, Spring 2011.

Advanced Studio, Spring 2011
Post-Katrina NOLA, Episode VII: Operation Gutter to Gulf, Phase III (pelicans +
pumping stations)

Derek Hoeferlin, Senior Lecturer

Water Management is an issue in New Orleans every day, from the scale of the gutter to the Gulf of Mexico. Gutter to Gulf, now in its third collaborative studio, aims to develop resilient, comprehensive, synthetic water management strategies for New Orleans and to provide clear, accessible information to diverse audiences. The initiative is designed to extend and support other citizen-led initiatives such as Dutch Dialogues.

More than five years after hurricanes Katrina and Rita, New Orleans continues to act as a crucible for dilemmas about infrastructure, landscape design, contemporary urbanism, recovery and rebuilding, and regional ecology. But architecture itself has been relatively absent in the conversation of how architecture can transform and proactively integrate within these contexts.

If New Orleans gets its fundamentals straight—fundamentals that must begin with a reinstated understanding that the ground we occupy cannot continue to be dominated with hard-line and static interventions, but rather begin to be respected with adaptive and dynamic negotiations—it can be a new model for a 21st-century American city. To make this happen, architects must become better aware of architecture’s multi-scaled relationships, and ultimately, the larger distribution contexts of watersheds that all architecture inhabits.

This studio focuses on the transformation of the water infrastructure of a deltaic urbanism from obstacle to catalyst. Building on the work of previous studios, students analyze and document the way water infrastructure functions today and make architectural proposals to transform that infrastructure into civic space. Work is conducted in collaboration with the University of Toronto's Department of Landscape Architecture.