Graduate portfolios

  • "Construct I (Windows Series)," acrylic, paper, ink on panel, 50" x 37", 2010.
    "Construct I (Windows Series)," acrylic, paper, ink on panel, 50" x 37", 2010.
  • "Construct IV (Windows Series)," acrylic, ink on paper, 18" x 56", 2010.
    "Construct IV (Windows Series)," acrylic, ink on paper, 18" x 56", 2010.
  • "Construct II (Windows Series)," acrylic, paper, ink on panel, 56" x 42", 2010.
    "Construct II (Windows Series)," acrylic, paper, ink on panel, 56" x 42", 2010.
  • "What Do I See (2)," acrylic, paper on panel, 18" x 24", 2010.
    "What Do I See (2)," acrylic, paper on panel, 18" x 24", 2010.
  • "What Do I See (1)," acrylic, paper on panel, 24" x 24", 2010.
    "What Do I See (1)," acrylic, paper on panel, 24" x 24", 2010.
  • "Construct III (Windows Series)," acrylic, paper, ink on canvas, 48" x 48", 2010.
    "Construct III (Windows Series)," acrylic, paper, ink on canvas, 48" x 48", 2010.

Kathryn Neale

Biography 

Kathryn Neale earned her MFA in Visual Art from Washington University in St. Louis in 2011. She was awarded the Louise Roblee McCarthy Scholarship and Teaching Assistantships for 2009-2011. Kathryn graduated from Eastern Illinois University with a master's degree in Painting and Drawing in May of 2008. Kathryn and her husband moved back to St. Louis this past year after living in Chicago and Washington, D.C. She is traditionally a painter, but her current work reflects her interests in combining painting with printmaking, papermaking, and even experimenting with larger wall installations this coming year.

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Statement 

Pattern is a powerful method to communicate a culture's link with the natural world in the form of an image. It is an abstraction that is a gateway to nature itself. Pattern embodies cultural values, attitudes, and perspectives, acting as a symbolic language addressing the natural world. My work reflects my current interests in nature, culture, and pattern. The simplification and idealization of the natural world, specifically the floral image in pattern, surrounds our interior and domestic spaces. Our interior and exterior spaces reflect both this longing for a connection to the natural world and also our need to control it. My painting process reflects this idea through the loose metaphor of a typical "suburban" window as a simple form to define the interior and exterior spaces, but I am more interested in how these spaces connect through natural world imagery. We long for the representation of the natural world in decorative forms, and we are constantly negotiating this divide between nature and culture. This longing perhaps suggests an inherent essence that we have lost in our own human nature, and we see and feel a connection to the natural world through the abstraction of pattern.